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Doing a little site maintenance today (05.26.14); please excuse things if they look disheveled. I'm just trying to move personal content to robertaustell.com and church/missional content to this lighthouse blog.

Welcome! The primary purpose of this blog is to explore and encourage around what it means to be winsome and sent into the world for God's glory. If you are new here, the
definition of "lighthouse-searchlight" is a good place to start. Come peruse the blog and add me to your RSS feed!

Thursday, March 06, 2014

ash wednesday - the "hands" service

In 2011 we were experiencing what I called blessed pandemonium on Wednesday nights. This year Wednesday nights are a bit tamer, but they are still multi-generational and include the men from the group home in our neighborhood. So, with the multiple attention levels and learning style needs present, we re-used the format from our Ash Wednesday service in 2011.

Our Ash Wednesday liturgy is about sin, death, and repentance and (as in 2011) is taken from the wide-ranging and weighty words of Psalm 44.  That Psalm has a number of references to "hands," so we decided to have a more kinesthetic learning-style service in order to really engage the children, youth, and group home folks alongside our adult members.

We used Psalm 44 as the structure for the whole service, and we used our hands (literally!) to understand and work through each part of it.  Here are the basics, and I will link to the order of worship below.  When I realized we'd be using our hands throughout, we did away with the bulletin and projected all the scripture and music on the screen.

Psalm 44:1-8   We opened with a Call to Worship and time of thanks and praise these verses, which celebrates God's faithfulness in times past.  We saw a visual of a strong hand.

We sang "Give Thanks" to express our thankfulness to God for that faithfulness.
Psalm 44:9-14    We talked about anger and blaming God for our circumstances and read these verses together while tightly clenching our hands into fists and holding that through these "God, look what you have done to us" verses.  (After 2-3 min of tight clenching, that's an interesting feeling and we talked about what holding on to anger does to us on the inside!) For blaming God (or self) we pointed our finger towards ourselves.
Psalm 44:17-19    The Psalm moves into more of a pleading tone, saying, "but we have not forgotten you (Lord)."  We clasped our hands into a child-like prayer gesture and prayed these verses together.  I then spoke briefly, asking whether Israel (and we) might have forgotten God, despite these words.
Psalm 44:20-22   We continued with "extended hands" (as if grasping for something), focusing on the words about "extending our hands to a strange god" - and I spoke briefly on sin and idolatries we sometimes reach for instead of God.

And with that move from anger to pleading to self-examination (which reminds me of the stages of grief!) led us into a prayer of confession.  I had been looking for a time in which we could join hands.  This didn't seem the obvious time, but we did and I reminded the congregation that though sin isolates, we are never alone - indeed, scripture reminds us that "all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God" - and so we prayed a prayer of confession together - eyes open reading screen - and holding hands.  Very interesting...

Psalm 44:23-24    These verses literally ask some questions of God - "Why do you sleep?  Why do you hide your face?" - so we raised one hand like a child would at school if asking a question, and we read these verses together.
Psalm 44:25    I noted that this verse is the next to last in the Psalm and is where we end up without God intervening to save.  "Our soul has sunk down into the dust; our body cleaves to the earth."  And at that point we had the imposition of ashes.
Psalm 44:26    Then the Psalm ends with a plea for help and hope: "Rise up, be our help, and redeem us..."  We read that, sang another song: "Give Us Clean Hands."
The benediction was from Romans 8:35-39, which quotes Psalm 44, which we had just read: "For your sake we are being put to death... sheep to the slaughter," but which surrounds that with one of the most hope-filled declarations of the Gospel in scripture: "Nothing will separate us from the love of God in Christ..."  I asked the congregation to hold out their hands in a receiving gesture as I spoke these words of blessing over them.


If you are interested in my notes or the PowerPoint slides just e-mail me at robert@gspc.net.

Sunday, March 02, 2014

this is grace

I was wowed today after church to see this description of today's service posted on Facebook. I'll also include my follow-up comment and another... to be sure there are days when we don't get it right, but then there are days like this where we catch a glimpse of God's purposes in the Church... and it's pretty glorious if you're looking!

PRISCILLA: One of the many reasons I love having the opportunity to celebrate communion Sunday with all of you is the kids. For whatever reason, even the youth seemed to be sitting with family today, my own daughter sat with me. As service progressed and I would glance around I saw so many children being physically loved on in the pews. This was not just the little ones either. Teenagers were getting and openly receiving love all around the sanctuary. Middle-schoolers ended up on someone's lap or holding a hand. One family's 3 elementary aged children all ended up on the 2 parents laps. These visuals added so much to the service this morning. Thank you all for sharing your precious children with this community of believers!
ROBERT (me): I also heard babies cooing, giggling, and fussing (and wouldn't trade it for anything); I saw our good friend with the stroke pat a young boy on the back as they arrived at the Communion Table to leave something in the Ten Cents a Meal basket; I saw a couple of guys from the men's group home worshiping all-out; I saw some new faces eagerly engaged in worship; I saw some folks I know are struggling with the whole idea of faith, but are there checking it out because someone they love is there. It is a very beautiful thing and I am beyond blessed to pastor this flock.
RUTH: For here is Jesus, welcoming all into HIS family - the young and the old, the strong and the weak, the puzzled and the calm, the grieving and the peaceful , the lonely and the scared. All looking so diverse on the outside, yet all made in HIS image, all with eternity set in their hearts by HIM. And this is what LOVE is - this is GRACE.

Monday, January 27, 2014

monday musings: truth and grace

Monday Musings are reflections on things I've been pondering lately. They may be a result of the previous day's sermon or come from my own life or the ministry I'm involved with. As with any of my posts, I invite your comments, questions, or further reflection. Thanks for stopping in!

A year or so ago I was preaching on truth and grace and one of the dear members of the church was led to create a grace and truth banner for our sanctuary.


I used that banner as a sermon illustration a few weeks ago and it grew into this graphic, which spelled out a little more of what I think Jesus was teaching.

 
The gist of the idea is that real grace and real truth are inseparable. There is a false grace ("license") and a false truth ("legalism"), but the real thing is held together in Christ (literally, IN Christ - embodied in as well as taught by).

Further, in that space between grace and truth there is FREEDOM, specifically two freedoms. There is FREEDOM TO FAIL, which is an important freedom. It is the freedom to hear the truth of God’s Word and be found both guilty and still wanted and loved. We settle for believing we are not guilty or for finding others who look worse than we are. Yet we are not righteous before God. And here’s the Good News: we are not cast out, but we are chosen, wanted, and loved.

And in understanding that, accepting that, and rising in that, there is the FREEDOM TO LIVE. That’s also in that space and tension between grace and truth, in the presence of Christ. It’s a freedom to obey God’s Word, not because we have to, but because we want to. It’s the freedom that comes from failing and experiencing forgiveness. It’s the freedom God has designed us for. And it exists there in the middle space.

That's the main idea I'm continuing to muse upon. You can read more in the three sermons linked below (especially the second one, where I first used this graphic).

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

top posts and sermons of 2013

Often bloggers will end the year with a review of "top posts." I'd like to do this for my blog and for my preaching. I am listing the "top posts" by the view count stat, accounting for the date posted (and how long each has been "up"). Feel free to read, share, or comment!

Top Blog Posts

Most Accessed Sermons
2013 Sermon Series
What stands out in my mind are several series I really enjoyed and learned from myself. I've linked the indexes below.
  • Jonah Series - Jonah was pretty much a wretched guy; we get a good, long look at the extent of God's love for the world
  • Lazarus Series - we spent a number of weeks slowly working through the Lazarus story and the significance of resurrection for us in daily life
  • Summer "Soak in the Word" Series - all summer we looked at well-known verses and studied them in context; we not only learned a lot about those individual and diverse texts, but also about how to read and study the Bible
  • Baptism Series - we spent six weeks (!) on baptism; highly recommended if you want to better understand this important sacrament of the church


Tuesday, December 17, 2013

on selfie's and other online behavior

Over on his blog, my friend, Nate Stratman, wrote a thoughtful piece called "Exegeting the Selfie" about the phenomenon of "selfie's," particularly among teenagers.  I'll send you there for that, but as we went back and forth a bit in the comments, I added these thoughts out of my own reflection:

As I think about WE adults and our closed Facebook Groups and customized Google searches and friends lists and ways of posting and relating online, I’ve got to think: “And we are different (than our kids)…. how?”

Our politics and discourse and information sources and online activity is collectively (and to be sure there are exceptions)… one collective grown-up selfie.

What will we do about that?

My best effort has been not to remove myself from the place where all this is going on, but to try to figure out ways to be an “authentic self” online, in groups, in seeking information, in holding discourse, in posting pictures and thoughts, in sharing…. and, back to your original topic, in how I relate in front of and with my daughters. Not perfect by a long-shot, but that’s the best I’ve come up with.
I'd be interested in hearing any thoughts YOU might have - either here or over at Nate's.

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